1945th Contingency Contracting Team returns from deployment

Col. Michelle Rose, commander of the 329th Regional Support Group, greets Capt. Bert Hankins, commander of the 1945th Contingency Contracting Team, Nov. 8, 2014, at Fort Hood, Texas. (Contributed photo)

Col. Michelle Rose, commander of the 329th Regional Support Group, greets Maj. Bert Hankins, commander of the 1945th Contingency Contracting Team, Nov. 8, 2014, at Fort Hood, Texas. (Contributed photo)

SANDSTON, Va. — Four Virginia Guard Soldiers from the Virginia Beach-based 1945th Contingency Contracting Team, 529th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 329th Regional Support Group returned to Fort Hood, Texas, Nov. 8, 2014, after deploying to Afghanistan in February 2014, where they provided contracting support to U.S. Central Command.  The Soldiers returned to Virginia after completing demobilization and reintegration training.

Staff Sgt. Steven Slater was assigned to Regional Contracting Command – East at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan and administered mission-critical life-support service contracts to Forward Operating Base Sultan Kheyl, Fenty and Bagram Airfield. (Courtesy photo)

Staff Sgt. Steven Slater was assigned to Regional Contracting Command – East at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan and administered mission-critical life-support service contracts to Forward Operating Base Sultan Kheyl, Fenty and Bagram Airfield. (Courtesy photo)

A contingency contracting team is a five-person unit that can provide capability to acquire goods and services from the commercial sector, stateside or overseas. Both the 1940th and 1945th CCT were established in 2009.

The team was comprised of Maj. Bert Hankins, commander of the 1945th CCT, Capt. William Perez, Staff Sgt. Steven Slater and Staff Sgt. Jose Vasquez.

The 1945th CCT was assigned to U.S. Central Command’s Joint Theater Support Contracting Command. C-JTSCC, pronounced “see-jit-sick,” plans, coordinates and delivers agile effects-based contracting for coalition forces in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom and beyond to enable long-term security, stability and prosperity, while maintaining the public’s trust.

“As anticipated, the team was separated once we arrived in theatre,” explained Hankins. “Vasquez was sent to Kandahar, Afghanistan and I was in Doha, Qatar.”

“Staff Sgt. Slater and Capt. Perez were both operating out of Kabul, Afghanistan,” Hankins said. Perez was assigned to a U.S. Air Force construction flight and worked on several projects for the Bagram Airfield, to include a major sewer system repair.

Slater was assigned to Regional Contracting Command – East at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan and administered mission-critical life-support service contracts to Forward Operating Base Sultan Kheyl, Fenty and Bagram Airfield. Within the first 60 hours, Slater executed a $189,076 urgent contract to provide material handling equipment allowing the rapid redeployment of Soldiers and civilians from FOB Sultan Kheyl. Slater also identified 63 delinquent payments valued at $2.4 million for a life-support contract at FOB Fenty. Within the first month, Slater processed 63 invoices for payments improving the financial wellbeing of the local contracted workforce. Slater also volunteered to plan, coordinate and execute the RCC-E move during the realignment of the CENTCOM contracting presence at Bagram Airfield.

Staff Sgt. Jose Vasquez (left) indentified and turned-in over $253,000 of excess property, which expedited the drawdown of forces at the Regional Contracting Center – South at Kandahar Airfield. (Courtesy photo)

Staff Sgt. Jose Vasquez (left) indentified and turned-in over $253,000 of excess property, which expedited the drawdown of forces at the Regional Contracting Center – South at Kandahar Airfield. (Courtesy photo)

Perez, also assigned to RCC-E, served as a warranted contracting officer and as a Joint Acquisition Review Board Chief and was responsible for coordinating with multiple military and civilian organizations and advising the command on the most effective procurement solutions. Perez also led a 10-person working group to validate 23 requests valued at $100 million to include crafting an acquisition strategy for a $4.3 million forward area and refueling point at FOB Fenty, which directly supported 34 U.S. aircraft.

Vasquez was assigned to a U.S. Air Force services flight as a warranted contracting officer where he executed 14 services contracts and completed two life-support service contracts for bulk delivery, waste water removal and gravel delivery within the first week of his arrival, explained Haskins. In addition, Vasquez was also responsible for landfill management, operations and maintenance services valued at over $100 million. He also identified and turned in over $253,000 of excess property, which expedited the drawdown of forces at the Regional Contracting Center – South at Kandahar Airfield.

Hankins served as a warranted contracting officer for the Services Branch at General Support Contracting Center at Camp As Sayliyah, Qatar. Hankins led four joint service contract specialists and executed theatre-wide contracts valued over $1.6 billion. Under his leadership, his team processed 31 contracting actions, obligated $70 million and 18 critical service contracts in direct support of U.S.-led coalition and Afghan forces.

In addition, Hankins conducted a $25 million source selection leading to the award of the Afghan Security Forces first advisory and assistance services contract. In addition to direct support, members of the 1945th CCT supported audits and oversight operations for multiple contract reviews to ensure that contracts were executed correctly, as well as several specific missions to support construction projects throughout CENTCOM.

Under his leadership, Capt. Bert Hankins (right) and his team processed 31 contracting actions, obligated $70 million and 18 critical service contracts in direct support of U.S.-led coalition and Afghan forces. (Courtesy photo)

Under his leadership, Capt. Bert Hankins (right) and his team processed 31 contracting actions, obligated $70 million and 18 critical service contracts in direct support of U.S.-led coalition and Afghan forces. (Courtesy photo)

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