34th CST conducts air load training with Air Guard

Members of the 34th Civil Support Team conduct air load training March 13, 2014, at Fort Eustis. (Photo by Capt. Derek J. Koenig, 34th Civil Support Team)

Members of the 34th Civil Support Team conduct air load training March 13, 2014, at Fort Eustis. (Photo by Capt. Derek J. Koenig, 34th Civil Support Team)

SANDSTON, Va. — Members of the Virginia National Guard’s 34th Civil Support Team conducted air load training March 12-13, 2014, at Langley Air Force Base to fulfill annual training requirements to validate procedures for moving equipment by air. Airmen from the 192nd Fighter Wing and 203rd RED HORSE Squadron served as subject matter experts and conducted the training.

“Part of our mission set is to be able to move the unit by air anywhere in the United States,” said Maj. Casey Cox, commander of the 34th CST. “This was valuable training for the CST, because it allowed us to work with our counterparts from Red Horse and the Air Wing on Langley Air Base. If we are called upon in the future to move by air we will know the facilities, people and mechanical challenges of deploying civilian type vehicles and trailers by military airlift.”

The first day of training consisted of vehicle and equipment shipping preparation, and the second day focused on aircraft static load training under the direct supervision of the Air National Guard subject matter experts, explained Capt. Derek Koenig, operations officer for the 34th CST.

“While many members of our team have moved personnel and equipment by military airlift, moving our specialized equipment and trailers present a unique set of challenges,” Cox said.

During the first day of training at the 192nd Fighter Wing /1st Fighter Wing Logistics Mobility Hangar on Langley Air Force Base, CST personnel performed all of the requirements to air load their vehicles for a contingency. This included measuring, weighing and identifying items that would be considered hazardous for air travel and utilizing a Department of Defense air load planning program to determine the exact safe location to place them on an aircraft for movement.

On the second day, the training shifted to Fort Eustis to the C-17 and C-5 static training simulators to load the vehicles into position utilizing the air load plans created on the first day of training.

“Everyone we encountered on Langley Air Base from the Base Commander to the Air Wing Leadership to the individual Airman was professional, helpful and interested in our success,” Cox said.